Shish Kabob Q&A

Shish Kabob

A Facebook friend asked some great questions about Shish Kabob, this week…

Q: Hey Perry,  question for you. I’m making a bunch of kabobs for my bible study tonight. To many to fit on my grill. I’ve never done them in the oven before. I’m not sure how, or how long??? I have to large pans double stacked? Any suggestions. Thank you!

A: First (and I have to do this, lol, it’s my job…) it sounds like you’re making “shish” kabobs. Kabob refers to evenly cut cubes of meat, which can be used on skewers, in casseroles, in tagines, etc. “Shish” is the skewer.

Okay…off my high-horse. smile emoticon  You COULD do the whole thing in the oven, but you’re going to lose a lot of what makes shish kabob awesome, which is the crispy carmelization from the Malliard reaction on a grill. I would suggest putting the meat on skewers and roasting it in a foiled-lined pan in the oven at 325F for 12-15 minutes (for 1-1 1/2 inch cubes).

The reason to skewer it first is that you never want to put a skewer (or a meat fork, for that matter) through cooked meat, as you’ll lose all of the internal juices. Grilling after that would turn it from dry meat to jerky, lol.

Tip: Veggies typically are done before the meat is, so to keep from over cooking them, I almost never put my meat and veggies on the same skewer anymore.

Finally, give them a little brush of oil (peanut, or another high heat oil*) on all sides, and finish them for a few seconds per side on your grill, as hot as you can get it, grilling just until marked.

Allow to rest, tenting loosely in foil, for at least 10 minutes before serving.

I love a good shish-kabob! One of my favorite things to eat in Nigeria was the super-spicy “Suyas” skewers!

Nigerian Suyas

-Chef Perry

*You want something with a high smoke point. I typically use peanut or grape-seed oil. See the chart at this link, you want something 400F or higher. Here’s a good list.

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The Chemistry of Grilling


Chimney steaks

They say that knowledge is power…and I believe that. Knowing WHY your meat grills the way it does is at least as important and knowing how to grill it!

-Chef Perry

MY KITCHEN Outreach ProgramBy the way, if you’re enjoying this recipe, please subscribe to our free newsletter! We’ll send seven amazing dinner recipes and a shopping list to your inbox each Friday. Plus, you’ll be helping us teach nutrition, shopping, and hands-on cooking classes to at-risk kids.

 

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Q & A: Roasting Goat


whole roasted goat

AJ asks:

“Any suggestions on ideal temp for a whole 30 pound goat? I have read 170.”

Chef Perry:

Thanks AJ for contacting us! I LOVE roasting goat in my La Caja China!

I’d suggest a box temp of 250F for about four hours, until almost done (160F). Then place goat over the coals of a low mesquite fire, on the LCC grilling rack. Baste with the butter sauce and let it smoke until tender and done (170-175F), maybe another 20 minutes.

The Rick Bayless method is probably the best I’ve found:

Roasting a whole goatAs far as internal temp of your goat: “Cook all raw goat beef steaks, chops, and roasts to a minimum internal temperature of 145 °F as measured with a food thermometer before removing meat from the heat source.” – So sayeth the USDA. Of course, they them say, in the very next line, “allow meat to rest for at least three minutes before carving or consuming” – which simply proved that they don’t know their…goat…from a hole in the ground.

If you pull a whole roast goat (or any other animal) off the heat, and don’t leave it the heck alone for at LEAST 20 minutes, tenting loosely in foil, you should be sentenced to live on McRib sandwiches and gas-station corndogs the rest of your life.

To slightly modify a favorite movie line, What does the USDA know about the needs of a man’s soul? :)

Oh, and for goats I like a simple wet rub of salt, olive oil, and fresh rosemary. If you want to go fancier than that, there are some fantastic marinade, rub, and sauce recipes over at TexasGoat.com.

Hope this helps, let us know how it turns out!

Chef Perry

MY KITCHEN Outreach ProgramBy the way, if you’re enjoying this recipe, please subscribe to our free newsletter! We’ll send seven amazing dinner recipes and a shopping list to your inbox each Friday. Plus, you’ll be helping us teach nutrition, shopping, and hands-on cooking classes to at-risk kids.

 

 

 

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If there ain’t smoke…

Artist Johnny Jones snapped this amazing shot at Snow’s BBQ, in Lexington, TX. which has had the distinction of being the number one ranked BBQ several times by Texas Monthly.

His son Robert graciously allowed me to use it for this meme.

THIS…is my happy place.

-Chef Perry

Smoke and BBQ Meme

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Sake-Soy Manila Clams on the Traeger

Sake Soy Steamed Clams

The recipe was inspired by (and only slightly modified) from Andrew Zimmern’s Manila Clams with Soy Butter.

Clams steamed with sake, soy, ginger, chilies, and sugar. Then tossed in a butter-broth reduction. Best clams I’ve ever eaten!

  •  1 cup sake
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 Tbs. ginger powder
  • 1-2 Tbs. garlic-chili sauce (to taste)
  • 2 pounds Manila clams, scrubbed
  • 1 stick unsalted butter, cubed
  • Salt

Preheat Traeger on high (following the normally recommended steps).

In a large disposable steam pan, combine the sake, soy sauce, sugar, ginger powder, and chile sauce. Bring just to a boil, whisking to dissolve the sugar.

Sake Soy Manila Clams Traeger recipe

Add the clams, close lid and cook, shaking the pan occasionally until the clams open, (about 5 minutes.) Using a slotted spoon, transfer the clams to a large bowl; discard any clams that do not open.

Sake Soy Manila Clams Traeger

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Add the butter to the saucepan and cook over moderate heat reduce Traeger to “smoke” setting. Close the lid and allow to smoke until butter is melted. Turn the heat back up to high, and whisk until incorporated. Add a dash or two of salt, then pour the sauce over the clams, toss to combine, and serve immediately with toasted french bread and ice cold sake.

NOTE: I make a larger batch of sauce than the original recipe, as I like to mix the leftover sauce 50/50 with hot water and make a killer Asian risotto with it!

Enjoy!

Chef Perry

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How clean does my grill need to be?

Cleaning your grill

Got this message from BBQ friend Grant today…

Hey Chef Perry! I have a BBQ question and figured I should run it by you: should I thoroughly clean the inside of my grill, or is it okay (or even good) to leave some grease, soot, etc on the inside of the cook box?

Grant,

Well, I’m sure this will raise the hackles of the germaphobic Purell junkies, but I tend to err on the side of the less conservative.

Think of the inside of your grill like a good cast iron skillet. Only an unwashed Philistine would thoroughly clean a cast-iron pan with soap and water, right? You worked hard for that curing, and you don’t want to lose it!

Rule of thumb:

  • Soot is good.
  • Grease is okay, but should be kept to a minimum, to avoid infernos (anything a dry paper towel won’t pick up is fine.)
  • Chunks are bad.

When you’re done grilling, crank the heat up as high as you can get it, lid down, until everything’s smokin’, then give the grill grates a good hard scrubbing with a stiff wire brush.

Hope that helps!

Chef Perry
Burnin’ Love BBQ

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Tips for Portable Grilling

Grilling on the Go: Tips for Portable Grilling

For me, no beach party, picnic or even a simple outdoor get-together is complete without the smell of something grilling. The aroma of smoke is what tells my brain that a good time is about to be had!



burgers at the beach

For grilling on the go, I would definitely recommend a portable gas grill (propane), for easy clean up. If you’re going to camping for days at a time, a charcoal grill may be an option, but you’ll still get a lot more “packing space” bang for your buck from propane.

What type of portable grill do you need? 3 questions to ask yourself:


1. How much space do I have?

If you’re cruising across the country in a full-size camper or pulling a trailer, you have some space to work with. If everything has to fit in the trunk of your Hyundai, look for a compact grill.

2. How many am I cooking for?

Cooking for one or two is a snap on pretty much anything that’s going to throw heat. However, if you’re the Brady Bunch, you’re really going to need to think about how much food you’re going to be able to crank out. Look for a large portable grill with higher BTUs and bigger grilling surface. Throw a couple of teenage boys in there and…well…via con dios!

3. What am I going to be cooking?

Burger, dogs, and steaks don’t require much space, but if you’re looking to do some real bbq, like pork shoulders, or briskets, you’re going to need a lot of surface space, multiple burners, and accurately controllable temperate settings.

Other grill questions to consider:

Portability:

Will you be lugging this thing down half-mile long sandy trails to the beach, or just from the car to the picnic table? If it’s going to be a trek, consider a light, compact grill.

Legs:

Speaking of picnic tables… are you planning on packing a heat-resistant table or cooking on the ground, if you find yourself without a picnic table? If you need a table-free option, consider a grill with legs. And if it does have legs, are they compatible with your height?

Custom Grilling

How “expandable” is this grill? Burgers might be fine right now, but next summer you might be on a whole chicken kick… can you upgrade/incorporate a rotisserie, smoker box, side burners, additional outer shelving, clip on lighting (strongly recommended) or removable secondary grill racks?

photo: good grilling = happy campers

Grill Quality

My number one piece of advice, above everything else…is to buy the best quality grill you can afford. Nothing can make or break a great day in the outdoors like the quality of (or lack of) dinner. Read online reviews, ask around, and if possible, borrow a similar model from a friend.

(Side note: Perry’s 11th commandment…no matter how fancy/expensive/high-tech your grill is…Thou shalt never put thy faith in an electric ignition. Pack a cheap plastic “trigger-style” butane lighter with your cooking gear at all times. In fact…pack two.)

Cooking on the go:

Here are a few tips I’ve gathered, mostly the hard way, over several decades of cooking on the go.

Photo: the author in his happy place

the author in his happy place

  • Be flexible. Don’t flip out and drive the next town to get that one green onion that the recipe calls for, but you forgot. Improvise, use an alternative ingredient, or skip it. As long as you have meat and fire…chances are good that it will still be delicious.
  • Bring small amounts of seasonings, condiments, and other food supplies to save packing space. Instead of bringing the huge bottle of ketchup, transfer just enough for the whole family in a smaller container.
  • Use block ice in your cooler. It lasts WAY longer than cube or ice.
  • Never leave food outside unattended, day or night, to prevent attracting bears, bugs, or other animals.
  • Don’t forget to bring a heavy duty aluminum foil and a couple of zip bags. They don’t take up much space and have a wide variety of uses.
  • Cover pots and pans during cooking so the meals will get done faster and to save fuel. This will also keep unwanted critters out of your food.
  • Have fun! Yes, we all love good food…but this ain’t Chopped…it’s your vacation. Enjoy your surroundings, take a hike, take a nap…if it’s going to create stress, well…sometimes a simple burger or hotdog is just what the doctor ordered!

For many of us, outdoor cooking, especially in a camp or on-the-go, is one of the best parts of being on vacation. The thrill of putting up a menu of different sumptuous meals, of putting together ingredients, of smelling the sweet aroma of meat, seasonings and vegetables, cooking and eating outside, surrounded by the smell of the forest, or the sea, and seeing that satisfied look on your family’s faces after feasting on the dinner you’ve prepared…

Well, that’s really what it’s all about, isn’t it?

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Burnin’ Love “BBQ” Grilled Chicken

Sweet Chili BBQ Chicken

Chef Chris grills these legs, thighs, or hindquarters to sweet, spicy, sticky perfection!

He maintains that the secret lies in baking the chicken first, so you can grill it over very high heat, just long enough to caramelize the sugars in the sauce, without drying out (or under-cooking) the meat beneath.

First rub chicken with our “Burnin’ Love Rub” (see recipe below) and let sit in the fridge 2-3 hours. Bake in a single layer on a foiled lined baking sheet  at 350 degrees for about 50 minutes, or until the internal temp reached 165F.

Finish on a preheated very hot grill, over direct heat. Sear both sides of the chicken first, then dip* with the sauce, turn, cook for about 5 to 10 minutes total, brushing with sauce and turning several times, until chicken is done.

How to sauce BBQ chicken

For the best application of sauce, dip each piece of chicken into a bowl of sauce, instead of brushing. For thicker sauce, repeat 2-3 times while on the grill.

Allow the chicken to rest, and the sauce to set, about 10 minutes, uncovered.

 

Perk’s “Burnin’ Love” Rub

(Shh…it’s a secret!)

¼ C fine sea salt
¼ C light brown sugar
2 Tbs garlic powder
2 Tbs onion powder
2 Tbs smoked paprika
2 Tbs coarse black pepper
2 Tbs hickory salt (or seasoned salt)

This is enough for 5-8lbs of chicken.

Sweet Chili BBQ Sauce

2 cup Sweet Baby Rays Brown Sugar or Hot & Sweet BBQ sauce
1 cup Thai sweet chili sauce (I like “Mae Ploy” brand)
1/2 cup apple cider vinegar
1/2 stick sweet cream butter

Combine all, simmer and allow to cool.



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Davidoff Demi-Tasse Cigars (Review)


Davidoff Demi-Tasse Cigars Review Traeger

 

Like a lot of my fellow smoke n’ fire friends, I like to enjoy a good cigar while the meat’s cooking.

So, when the opportunity arose to smoke and review* these Davidoff Demi-Tasse cigars, I jumped at the chance!

These little 10-minute cigars are perfect for a quick grilling session, or for those last few minutes while those ribs are achieving the perfect glaze.

The Demi-Tasse are some great smokes; big Davidoff taste in a little package…a mild, yet aromatic and full-bodied smoke. They are long-filler, and taste just like a larger, mild Davidoff, but at a much more economical price.

From the Davidoff Website:

“The Davidoff Family of Geneva, Switzerland has been producing the world’s finest luxury cigars for the most discriminating of smokers for generations. Truly rare gems, Davidoff cigars are as close to perfect in character, aroma and quality as it gets. If you seek a highly refined and luxurious cigar for a special occasion or have the means to enjoy a moment of intense pleasure, relaxation and happiness on a daily basis, make Davidoff cigars your cigar of choice.”

Davidoff Demi Tasse ReviewDAVIDOFF DEMI TASSE CIGAR
Strength: Full
Shape: Cigarillo
Size: 4 x 25
Country: Netherlands
Wrapper Color: Natural
Wrapper Origin: Ecuadorian
Wrapper Leaf: Connecticut
Price – 97.50 for a box of 50 or $2.10 per cigar

I really liked them. A lot of complexity and flavor…a great cigar to enjoy at the grill!

BTW, Famous Smoke Shop offers Davidoff Smokes here.

What’s your favorite smoke when you’re working the smoker?

Chef Perry
Burnin’ Love BBQ

PS – If you’re enjoying this article, please subscribe to our free meal planning newsletter; we’ll send seven amazing dinner recipes and a shopping list to your inbox each week.

Plus, you’ll be helping us feed the hungry, and teach nutrition, shopping, and hands-on cooking classes to at-risk and foster kids!

*Disclaimer: while I receive products, including the cigars used in this review, free from vendors, I am under no obligation, real or implied, to provide anything but an honest, personal-opinion and review, positive or otherwise, in return. The opinions put forth in this post are strictly my own, and are in no way influenced by how I obtained this product.

 

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Orion LED Lantern Saved the Day (or at least dinner!)

So, in yesterday’s post I shared my new favorite Easter Ham recipe, and how to smoke it on the Traeger.

What I didn’t mention was that an equipment failure at a critical point in cooking, almost FUBAR’d the whole thing!

Just before it was time to start glazing this beauty, I had a dark moment…literally. The ballast failed on my overhead lights (above my Traeger), plunging my carport/BBQ Studio into utter darkness.

When I needed to see what I was doing most, this is what I was looking at…

Orion LED Camping Lantern Review

Just before full panic set in, I remembered that I has just received an Orion LED Camping Lantern to review. I was saving it for our family camp-out in July, but this seemed like an opportune time to bust it out.

Orion LED Camping Lantern Review

The Orion is compact and feels solid while still lightweight. It’s packaged with everything needed to get it up and going fast, including 3 AA batteries and 2 lithium ion batteries (for maximum operating time and flexibility.) The Orion also functions has a built in “Power Bank” that can be used to charge phones, tablets, or any other handheld device so that you are never left without power (cables also included.)

It took about a minute to unpack and load the batteries…and none of those annoying little screwed on battery covers either, the whole top and bottom unscrew easily, making loading the batteries super easy. Being a guy with big thumbs (and lots of them) I REALLY like this feature!

Anyway, back to the Easter Crisis of ’15…

Orion LED Camping Lantern Review

The Orion Lantern telescopes open (so the bulb is protected when not in use), and fires up automatically.

The metal handles made it easy to hang from a handy hook, and as you can see, this little powerhouse gave more than enough light to cook by and, unlike uni-directional bbq lamps, it lit my entire cooking area, including my prep table.

And, just like that I could see my masterpiece once more…and Easter dinner was saved! (Insert wild applause here.)

My rating: A solid 4 Stars

Orion LED Camping Lantern Review

By the way…if you want to get this recipe, click here.

Sooo, it looks like I’ll be ordering another Orion Lantern for camping season, because THIS one is staying in my BBQ box for the next time I need a great back-up light to cook by.

Chef Perry
Burnin’ Love BBQ

By the way, if you’re enjoying this article, please subscribe to our free meal planning newsletter; we’ll send seven amazing dinner recipes and a shopping list to your inbox each week.

Plus, you’ll be helping us feed the hungry, and teach nutrition, shopping, and hands-on cooking classes to at-risk and foster kids!

Here are some specs from the product website:

Orion LED Camping Lantern ReviewProduct Description

The Orion Ultimate Survival LED Lantern and Power Bank by Supernova is the most versatile survival tool available and features both a stunningly bright LED Lantern and a built in Power Bank.

It features:

✔ 180 Max Lumens Lantern for camping, emergencies, hiking, and more

✔ Built in Power Bank charges phones, tablets, or any other handheld device so that you are never left without power

✔ Easy On/Off Operation by simply opening and closing the lantern

✔ Compact and retractable design for easy storage and mobility

✔ Operates on either 3 AA batteries (included) or 2 lithium ion batteries (also included) for maximum operating time and flexibility

✔ Brushed gun metal finish makes the Orion as durable as it is beautiful

The Ultra Bright LED Lantern component has 4 different modes of operation:

– High

– Low

– Red

– Flashing Red

*Disclaimer: while I occasionally receive products, including the lantern used in this review, free from the vendor. I am under no obligation, real or implied, to provide a positive review, in return. The opinions put forth in this post are strictly my own, and are in no way influenced by how I obtained this product.

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