Category Archives: In The Box Recipes

Pulled Pork Tamales with Southwestern Béarnaise Sauce for Cinco de Mayo

Pulled Pork Tamales




This idea just popped into my head a few weeks ago, and I haven’t been able to shake it.

Finally, I couldn’t stand it anymore and went shopping. I smoked my pork shoulder the day before in my La Caja China #3, using apple wood.

Turned out…very nice.

Slow Smoked Pork Shoulder

7 lb. boneless pork shoulder roast
2 tablespoons salt
2 tablespoons sugar
2 tablespoons ground cumin
2 tablespoons garlic powder
2 tablespoons freshly ground black pepper
1 tablespoon cayenne pepper
1/4 cup smoked paprika
1/4 cup brown sugar

Preparation:

Combine all dry ingredients in a small bowl and mix well.

Pulled Pork Tamales

Finish butterflying the shoulder (along the cut the butcher made while removing the bone) and rub all surfaces of the pork with the dry rub.

Pulled Pork Tamales with Southwestern Béarnaise Sauce

Roll the pork back up, tie with kitchen string, and season the outside.

In a standard smoker, pork shoulder cook time can be figured at approximately 1.5 hours per pound, so an 8 pound shoulder will require about 12 hours in the smoker at 225. (The Caja will require significantly less time, see my post, here, for roasting instructions.)

Pulled Pork Tamales

For more of Chef Perry’s La Caja China Cooking recipes, check out his cookbooks at:

www.perryperkinsbooks.com

I like to smoke mine to an internal temp of around 140 (about half the cook time – be sure to use a good probe thermometer), baste with a mixture of 1/2 barbeque sauce and 1/2 cider vinegar, wrap in foil, and slip it into a 225 degree oven to finish. Pull it from the Caja or oven when them internal meat temp reached 200 degrees, not a minute earlier.

Pulled Pork Tamales

Allow the roast to rest, tented loosely in foil for about an hour, pull or chop the meat, and toss with another cup of bbq sauce/vinegar mixture and salt, to taste. You may use it to assemble your tamales now, or refrigerate in up to 3 days.



Pulled Pork Tamales

To assemble the tamales, you’ll need:

4 C MaSeCa Instant Corn Masa Mix
2 tsp salt
1 tsp garlic powder
1 C corn oil
1 1/2 cups chicken broth
1/2 package of corn husks
2 cups pulled pork, cooled

You can follow this simple video…

Southwestern Bernaise Sauce

Southwestern Béarnaise Sauce

Béarnaise is a sauce made of clarified butter emulsified in egg yolks and flavored with herbs. It is considered to be a ‘child’ of the mother Hollandaise sauce, one[2] of the five sauces in the French haute cuisine mother sauce repertoire. The difference is only in their flavoring: Béarnaise uses shallot, chervil, peppercorn, and tarragon, while Hollandaise uses lemon juice.

1/4 cup chopped fresh tarragon leaves
2 shallots, minced
1/4 cup champagne vinegar
1/4 cup dry white wine
3 egg yolks
1 stick unsalted butter, melted
1 tsp dry rub
1 sm can diced green chilies

In a small saucepan, combine the tarragon, shallots, vinegar and wine over medium-high heat. Bring to a simmer and cook until reduced by half. Remove this reduction from heat and set aside to cool.

Blend yolks and béarnaise reduction together. With the blender running, add 1/3 of the butter in a slow steady stream. Once it emulsifies, turn the blender speed up to high and add the remaining butter. Season with dry rub, fold in the green chilies, and set aside in a warm spot until ready to spoon over the finished (and peeled) tamales.

We also made a yellow sriracha sauce recipe that my friend Patti shared with me.

Sriracha is the name for a Thai hot sauce named after the coastal city of Si Racha, in the Chonburi Province of central Thailand, where it was first produced for dishes served at local seafood restaurants. It is a paste of chili peppers, distilled vinegar, garlic, sugar and salt. Sriracha is a common condiment in many Asian restaurants and increasingly found in American and European homes.

It is also known as rooster sauce because of the rooster featured on its label. Typically a very hot red sauce, this is a milder version using yellow peppers.

MY KITCHEN Outreach ProgramBy the way, if you’re enjoying this recipe, please subscribe to our free newsletter! We’ll send seven amazing dinner recipes and a shopping list to your inbox each Friday.

Plus, you’ll be helping us teach nutrition, shopping, and hands-on cooking classes to at-risk kids, in our MY KITCHEN Outreach Program.

 

Personally, I liked it even better with the tamales than the Southwester Béarnaise…unfortunately, I was too busy eating to get pictures of the two together.

Here’s the recipe, tho’…

Yellow Sriracha Sauce

3 1/2 cups yellow bell
1/2 cup chopped hot yellow peppers
10 cloves of garlic, smashed
2 tsp salt
2 1/2 cups distilled white vinegar
2 Tbs light brown sugar

Yellow Sriracha Sauce

Chop the chilies and place in a bowl. Add garlic, salt & vinegar. Cover and let set on the counter overnight or 8 hours.

In the morning, remove peppers & garlic from bowl and place in saucepan. Add 1 cup of the vinegar mixture, 1/2 cup of water and the 2 Tbs of sugar.

Yellow Sriracha Sauce

You can add more vinegar if you want it more tart and a thin sauce. Bring to a boil and then simmer  for 5 min. Remove from heat and cool slightly.

Yellow Sriracha Sauce

Puree until smooth.

If you love this recipe, please share it!

Also, you can open the “print friendly” version of this recipe, by clicking here.

My work being inspected…

Yellow Sriracha Sauce




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Luau-style Whole Roast Pig

Whole Luau Pig in La Caja China

Our friend Fred asks:

Have you a special recipe or suggestion on a 90 lb. luau style pig?

Note…done in a Caja China No. 2


Fred,

You bet I do!

I’ve done many whole luau pigs in my Model #1, #2, and the Semi-Pro model, as well.

Here’s my step-by-step video recipe and instructions for Carolina (bbq) whole pig.

The three biggest suggestions I would have, are:

Make sure that your pig is completely thawed, and as close to room temp as your comfortable with, before you start cooking.

Start with as much coal as the instructions say. I’ve used 10lbs instead of 15, and the box just won’t come to cooking temp. It’s really a very scientific design, and the instructions have to be followed pretty close (not always my strong point, lol!) BTW – A standard Weber charcoal chimney holds almost exactly 7lbs of Kingsford briquettes.

Overcome the desire to lift the lid and “peek” during cooking. La Caja China is designed to not be opened at all, except to flip the pig, and it really messes up the cooking time when folks do so. I even use a large metal scoop to remove excess ashes, so I don’t have to lift the lid off to do so.

Hawaiian Mojo

Recipes from “La Caja China Cooking” & “La Caja China World” by Perry P. Perkins

This is my variation of Roberto’s Cuban Mojo. “Real” luau pig is typically seasoned with just salt and liquid smoke., but I like the sweet, Polynesian overtones that this marinade/mop adds to the pork.

1 C orange juice
1 C pineapple juice
½ C mesquite liquid smoke*
1 Tbs oregano
1 Tbs minced garlic
1 tsp cumin
3 tsp salt
4 oz. of water

Mix all the ingredients and let it sit for a minimum of one hour.

For marinade/injection, add the above recipe to 1 ½ gallons of water, and 13 oz. of table salt.

Blend all ingredients and let it sit for a minimum of one hour, strain and inject, or place meat in a cooler and pour marinade to cover overnight.

MY KITCHEN Outreach ProgramBy the way, if you’re enjoying this recipe, please subscribe to our free newsletter! We’ll send seven amazing dinner recipes and a shopping list to your inbox each Friday.

Plus, you’ll be helping us teach nutrition, shopping, and hands-on cooking classes to at-risk kids, in our MY KITCHEN Outreach Program.

 

After injecting/soaking the pig or shoulder, apply a salt rub all over the meat, use Kosher Salt or Sea Salt.

*Personally, I would skip the liquid smoke and use

Let me know if you have any other questions on this, or any recipe, and let me know how it turns out!

And just ’cause you seem like a good guy, Fred, here’s the full recipes from La Caja China Party for my Luau Pig and my favorite Big Island Mac Salad…

Happy Q’ing!

-Chef Perry

Platter of Luau food

A big ol’ platter of awesome…Luau Pork, Kalbi short ribs, Lomi Salmon, Mac Salad, Purple Yam, Poi…mmm….

Puaʻa Kalua 

(Hawaiian whole roast pig)

Kālua is a traditional Hawaiian cooking method that utilizes an imu, or underground oven. Hawaiian puaʻa kālua (roast pig)  is commonly served at luau feasts. The first known use of the kalua method was in the early 1900s by two girls, Princess Danielle Kealoha and Stephanie Ikaika.

1 – 45-80lb pig, cleaned and butterflied
2 cups mesquite liquid smoke (or better ~ use your A-MAZE-N Smoker)
1 cup Hawaiian salt (or fine sea salt)
8 to 12 large ti/banana leaves

Brush the entire pig with a light layer of liquid smoke, then sprinkle the whole pig inside and out with fine sea-salt.

If you have an A-MAZE-N smoker for your La Caja, skip the brushing with liquid smoke and just burn some apple wood pellets for the first two hours or so. Use the liquid smoke wash at the end of the recipe, if you want more smoke flavor in the meat.

Roast Pig with Banana Leaves in La Caja China

Spread several ti (or banana) leaves on the bottom rack. Place pig between the racks, skin side down, and tie using the 4 S-Hooks.

Cover box with the ash pan and charcoal grid. Add 16 lbs. of charcoal for Model #1 Box or 18lbs. for Model #2, or Semi Pro Box, and light up. Once lit (20-25 minutes) spread the charcoal evenly over the charcoal grid.

Cooking time starts right now. (Write it down.)

After 1 hour, add 10 lbs. of charcoal. Continue to add 10 lbs. of charcoal every hour until you reach 195 on the meat thermometer.

IMPORTANT: Do not open the box until you reach the desired temperature!

Once you reach 195, (4-4 ½ hours) lift the charcoal grid shake it well to remove the ashes, now place it on top of the long handles.

Remove the ash pan from the box and dispose of the ashes.

Flip the pig over, baste and salt again, and replace the cover to crispy the skin.

Flipping is easily done using La Caja China’s patented Rack System, just grab the end of the rack, and lift and slide as you pull upward, using the other hand grab the top end of the other rack and slide it down.

Whole Luau Pig La Caja China

Pull out as much of the ti/banana leaves as possible (toss), and score the skin using a very sharp knife – this helps to remove the fat and crisp the skin. I just cut a shallow X in each of square of the rack. You want to cut through the skin, but not into the meat.  Sprinkle more sea salt on the skin and, if you want, a little more liquid smoke.

Cover the box again with the ash pan and the charcoal grid; do not add more charcoal at this time.

After 30 minutes, take a peek, if Ms. Piggy isn’t quite as gold and crispy as you wanted, close the lid another ten.  You will continue doing this every 10 minutes until the skin is crispy to your liking.

Crispy Skin La Caja China

Once the pig is to your liking, set the lid back on at an angle, so the pig stays warm but isn’t cooking,  and let it rest for 30-60 minutes…it will still be too hot to touch bare-handed.

For easier carving, lay the whole pig, ribs up (on it’s back), and use a boning knife to remove the entire skeleton before slicing or chopping the meat.

Dissolve 2 tablespoons Hawaiian salt in 2 cups boiling water and add 2 tablespoons of liquid smoke. Toss with cooked pork and let stand in this solution for a few minutes before serving.

Serve with Macaroni salad…and a Mai Tai.

Ohoiho!

Island Mac Salad

Big Island Macaroni Salad

Macaroni salad is a staple of the Hawaii-style plate lunch. It’s slightly tangy, slightly sweet and traditionally served with kalua pork and a few scoops of white rice. After MUCH experimentation, this is my favorite method and ingredients, but everyone’s recipe is just a little different. Have fun with it!

1 pound large elbow macaroni
¼ cup very finely grated onion
¼ cup shredded carrots
¼ cup diced green onions
2½ cups Best Foods Real Mayonnaise
1 teaspoon salt
1 Tbs (lots) coarse black pepper

Cook pasta until soft and fat, but you can go al dente if you prefer.

Stir in onion and mayo,

Add salt and pepper, to taste. Stir well and refrigerate 2-3 hours before serving. Sprinkle a little diced green onion over the top.

The abundance of black pepper is what, in my opinion, sets Hawaii-style macaroni salad apart, and above, any other recipe I’ve tried.

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How to get super crispy skin on whole roast pig

Caja China crispy skin

A friend of mine asked about how to achieve that super crispy “pig candy” skin when roasting a pig in La Caja China.

First of all, just following the directions on the box itself is a great start, and will get you a yummy crisp skin. For that “potato-chip” crisp that makes Cuban and Fillipino lechón so amazing, however, I suggest a couple of things above and beyond the typical recipe.

The first two steps can be used with any “whole hog” cooking method, while the third is specific to La Caja China style roasting boxes.

The fact is, the dryer skin is when you start cooking, the crisper is will turn out.

That lovely crunchy skin on Peking Duck comes from air-drying the duck’s skin prior to cooking. Similarly, there are a couple of things you can to to get super-crunch results with your pig. crispy pig skin

#1. After marinading (or if not marinading, then the night before roasting) pat the entire pig down with paper towels to remove excess moisture. Then, rub the skin generously with a salt-heavy rub, or straight sea salt. I recommend a fine grind, as it will adhere better. Personally, I prefer to inject the pig (or whatever I’m roasting), instead of marinating it externally, as soaking in liquid for hours is kinda counter productive to drying the skin, lol. It’s also a lot less messy. http://i1.wp.com/burninlovebbq.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/p9110317.jpg?resize=396%2C266 #2. As you bring the pig to room temp (a must), set up an oscillating fan – or, preferably, two – pointed at the uncovered pig, to help to help “air-dry” the skin as much as possible. If your fan(s) can’t cover the whole carcass at one time, move them around every 30 minutes or so. http://i1.wp.com/burninlovebbq.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/article1.jpg?resize=331%2C271 (Yes, I know these are ducks…but you get the idea! Btw, here’s THAT recipe –Peking Duck ala La Cajita China)

#3. When you flip your pig to brown the skin for the last 30 minutes or so, pat the skin down again with paper towels, give it another sprinkle of rub, and (most important) set the coal tray back on at a slight angle so that there are gaps on both sides of the box.

This will allow any excess moisture cooking out of the skin to escape the box, instead of being contained and “steaming” the skin.

Watch your pig carefully at this point, as a dry skin will brown (and burn) much faster than one with a high moisture content.

Check out our video for a step-by-step on roasting a whole pig.

Hope that helps, lemme know if you have any questions!

– Chef Perry

PS – I like this Q&A so much, I’m going to update my free ebook, “La Caja China Guidebook” with this info! Thanks!

PPS – If your first try or two for crispy skin doesn’t turn out perfect, DON’T THROW THAT SKIN OUT! Instead, bag it, let it cool (or freeze), then, when you’re ready for an awesome snack, cut the skin into 2×2 squares, and place them on a rack , skin up, over a foil-lined cookie sheet.

Sprinkle lightly with salt or rub, and roast in a 300d oven for 3 hours or until deeply tan and very crispy. Allow to cool until just warm, and serve with a dipping mix of cider vinegar, salt, and red pepper flake.So FREAKIN’ good!

MY KITCHEN Outreach ProgramBy the way, if you’re enjoying this recipe, please subscribe to our free newsletter! We’ll send seven amazing dinner recipes and a shopping list to your inbox each Friday.

Plus, you’ll be helping us teach nutrition, shopping, and hands-on cooking classes to at-risk kids, in our MY KITCHEN Outreach Program.

 

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Q & A: Roasting Goat


whole roasted goat

AJ asks:

“Any suggestions on ideal temp for a whole 30 pound goat? I have read 170.”

Chef Perry:

Thanks AJ for contacting us! I LOVE roasting goat in my La Caja China!

I’d suggest a box temp of 250F for about four hours, until almost done (160F). Then place goat over the coals of a low mesquite fire, on the LCC grilling rack. Baste with the butter sauce and let it smoke until tender and done (170-175F), maybe another 20 minutes.

The Rick Bayless method is probably the best I’ve found:

Roasting a whole goatAs far as internal temp of your goat: “Cook all raw goat beef steaks, chops, and roasts to a minimum internal temperature of 145 °F as measured with a food thermometer before removing meat from the heat source.” – So sayeth the USDA. Of course, they them say, in the very next line, “allow meat to rest for at least three minutes before carving or consuming” – which simply proved that they don’t know their…goat…from a hole in the ground.

If you pull a whole roast goat (or any other animal) off the heat, and don’t leave it the heck alone for at LEAST 20 minutes, tenting loosely in foil, you should be sentenced to live on McRib sandwiches and gas-station corndogs the rest of your life.

To slightly modify a favorite movie line, What does the USDA know about the needs of a man’s soul? 🙂

Oh, and for goats I like a simple wet rub of salt, olive oil, and fresh rosemary. If you want to go fancier than that, there are some fantastic marinade, rub, and sauce recipes over at TexasGoat.com.

Hope this helps, let us know how it turns out!

Chef Perry

MY KITCHEN Outreach ProgramBy the way, if you’re enjoying this recipe, please subscribe to our free newsletter! We’ll send seven amazing dinner recipes and a shopping list to your inbox each Friday. Plus, you’ll be helping us teach nutrition, shopping, and hands-on cooking classes to at-risk kids.

 

 

 

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Smoked BBQ in La Caja China with the A-Maze-N Smoker

Using the A-Maze-N smoker with your La Caja China roasting box to create real, southern-style, smoked BBQ.

The Am-Maze-N Smoker and La Caja China

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La Caja China = Lots of smiles!

Whole roast pig

La Caja China rocked it at last month’s Sparks of Hope camps!

Sparks of Hope Boys CampAs part of our MY KITCHEN Program, we taught cooking classes during the days, and then did a pig roast feast each Saturday night. “Knights of the Round Table” for the boys (no utensils, lol), and “Island Luau” for the girls.

For these young survivors of horrific abuse, anything that brings a smile to their faces is a major victory, and there were LOTS of smiles at the feast!

Thank you Roberto and La Caja China for being a faithful supporter of our work with these kids, and for helping us bring a smile to their faces.

And, of course, the pigs were awesome!

Chef Perry
Burnin’ Love BBQ
MY KITCHEN Outreach

Carving a whole roast pig

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President’s Day and Barbecue

Coming up on one of my favorite barbecue holidays…Presidents Day!

Oh sure, you can have your Memorial Day, and Independence Day, and Labor Day, but the problem with those are, everyone else is barbecuing as well! It can be hard to get enough folks over to justify a decent pig-pickin’ when every Weber on the block is burnin’ dogs.

Besides, Presidents Day has such a fine history or barbecue…

“When George Washington “went in to Alexandria to a Barbecue and stayed all Night,” as he wrote in his diary for May 27, 1769, he won eight shillings playing cards and probably ate meat from a whole hog, cooked for hours over hardwood coals, then chopped or “pulled.”

By the early nineteenth century at the latest, a sauce of vinegar and cayenne pepper (originally West Indian) was being sprinkled on the finished product.  This ur-barbecue can be found to this day in eastern North Carolina and the adjoining regions of South Carolina and Virginia, virtually unchanged.” (Adapted from Holy Smoke: The Tar Heel Barbecue Tradition, by John Shelton Reed, Dale Volberg Reed, and Will McKinney to be published by the University of North Carolina Press, forthcoming 2008.)

Says Steven Raichlen, author of “Planet Barbecue” and host of “Primal Grill” on PBS, “Our presidents were known to be big fans of the laid-back pastime as well. George Washington’s diaries abound with references to barbecues, including one that lasted for three days. George Washington was a major barbecue buff, and when Abraham Lincoln’s parents were married, their wedding feast was a barbecue.”

Lyndon Johnson built his campaign around Texas-style barbecues, a variation on an old tradition: In the 19th century, roast pig and whiskey were staples at political rallies. Having combined generous amounts of Kentucky bourbon and slow-roasted pork on occassion myself, I can say with some authority that this is a wise political tactic…after several hours you would passionately cast your vote for the pig, if someone put a ballot in your hand!

In fact, President Johnson had a full-time barbecue chef, Mr, Walter Jetton, employed on the LBJ Ranch full time. I have his cookbook…it’s highly amusing.

Ronald Reagan engaged the BBQ catering services of Wayne Monk of Lexington for the 1983 Economic Summit in Williamsburg.

Even President Obama, who, having grown up in Hawaii, is likely to have an undeniable love of pork…I mean bbq of  course…got into the action with Iron Chef Bobby Flay, grilling up some fine looking steaks at the White House for the Young Men’s Barbeque in 2009. (Hope they were good…we payed for ’em! lol)

So, in tribute to my favorite bbq holiday, here’s how you can prepare some fantastic, White House worthy pulled pork barbecue of your own on your gas grill or La Caja China (click links for recipes.)

And, of course, if you can get a herd of hungry revelers over, you can go whole hog…but I’d put the bourbon away first, if I were you.

And here’s my favorite “traditional” bbq sauce recipe, from …which is probably pretty similar to what Ol’ George sunk his wooden teeth into, at those all-night poker parties!

Perk’s Tradition BBQ Sauce

1 cup white vinegar
1 cup cider vinegar
1 tablespoon brown sugar
1 tablespoon cayenne pepper
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon ground black pepper

Combine the white vinegar, cider vinegar, brown sugar, cayenne pepper, salt and pepper in a jar or bottle with a tight-fitting lid. Refrigerate for 1 to 2 days before using so that the flavors will blend. Shake occasionally.

Enjoy the day!

-Perry

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Thanksgiving Barbecue Menu

May all your holidays be filled with the blessings that life can bestow. And though, for all of us, in different ways, this has been a tough year, try to remember something my father taught me. Something I reflect upon that occasionally has helped me through a tough time…

At your moment of greatest suffering, when everything seems it’s darkest, somewhere in the world, some unsuspecting turkey is about to have a fistful of stuffing shoved deep into his eviserated body cavity…

In other words, things could be worse. Happy Thanksgiving!” – Bon Saget

Here’s the Burnin’ Love BBQ Plan…

Appetizer 1: Mojo Shrimp Skewers
Grilled seafood makes a great appetizer before a big dinner because not only it it a light, tasty snack that won’t dull the tastebuds, it’s also quick and easy grilling for a chef who’s in full-bore production mode.

2 lbs sliced bacon
64 raw prawns, tail off
2 C Traditional Cuban Mojo
¼ C Adobo Criollo Spice
32 skewers, soaked (if wooden)

See Instructions here.

Appetizer 2: Caprese Tomato Bites
I like to follow a hot appetizer with a cold one and, since the following salad recipe has none of these ingresients, this balances nicely.

1 pint cherry tomatoes, about 16
2 mozzarella cheese sticks
16 fresh basil leaves, small
Extra virgin olive oil
Sea salt

See instructions, here.

Salad: Wild Greens tossed with Balsamic Viniegrette

Turkey: Mojo Brined Turkeys in La Caja China

(2) 12-14lb turkeys, thawed and rinsed
Mojo Brine
Peanut oil
1/2 cup Adobo Criollo spices
Water to cover

See instructions, here.

Cuban Tostone Stuffing

6 green plantains
Vegetable oil
1 lb. thick bacon, diced
6 cloves garlic, chopped
3 sweet chili peppers, seeded & diced
1 sweet onion, diced
1/3 cup olive oil
1/3 cup chicken broth
Salt & pepper to taste

Sides: Garlic Mashed Potatoes & Giblet Gravy, Simple Grilled Asparagus

‘Nuff said.

See instructions, here.

‘Course, if you wanna try something completely different…but still savor the flavor or Thanksgiving, try your hand at our Turkey Explosion Recipe!

1 pound sliced bacon
1.5 pounds ground turkey
1 tablespoon each sage, garlic powder, salt, pepper
1 cups breadcrumbs
1/2 sweet onion, diced fine
1/4 lb Mushrooms. sliced thin
2 stalks celery, diced fine
2 Tbs fresh minced garlic
1/4 cup sweet cream butter
1/4 cup turkey rub (see below)
3/4 cup cranberry barbecue sauce (see link)

See instructions, here.

…and, of course…it wouldn’t be Thanksgiving without the WKRP Turley Drop!

Happy Thanksgiving all!

-Perry

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Skinnin’ a pig? Puerto Rican brilliance!

Hey all,

Just got this email from Scott…

“Thanks for taking the time to read this! I have a quick question: We are roasting a 70 lb pig in a La Caja China Roaster.

My partners mother-in-law is Cuban and tells us that there is an old Puerto Rican recipe that calls for REMOVING the skin from the pig prior to roasting, then seasoning the meat, and placing the pig back “into” the now separate skin, then roasting as usual.

Now I am not a fan of this, but I figured I would ask if this is something you would suggest? I mean, might it dry out the meat?

Thanks – Scott”

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Instrucciones Para Asado: Ase su puerco en tan solo 4 horas!

Instrucciones Para Asado

¡Que aproveche amigos!

-Perry

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