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Salt Crusted Prime Rib

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Salt Crusted Prime Rib

From La Caja China Cooking, 2010

The traditional preparation for a standing rib roast is to rub the outside of the roast with salt and seasonings and slow-roast with dry heat. In the United States, it is common for barbecue purists to apply smoke to the uncooked rib roast at low heat for 2-3 hours before dry roasting.

In the United Kingdom, Yorkshire pudding is frequently served as a side dish with prime rib

½ C coarsely ground black pepper
2/3 C kosher salt
2 head of garlic, peeled
1/4 C fresh rosemary
2 Tbs smoked paprika powder
½ C olive oil
1 – 5-6-pound prime rib roasts (6 bones).

In a food processor, combine the salt, pepper, garlic cloves, rosemary and paprika, and process until fine. Add the olive oil and pulse to form a paste. Pat the rib roast dry with a paper towel or napkin.

Place the prime rib roast on a cutting board, bone-side up and rub with 1 tablespoon of the salt paste.

Pack the salt paste all over the fatty surface of the roast, pressing to help it adhere. Let the prime rib stand at room temperature for 2 hours.

Insert meat thermometer so tip is in thickest part of beef, not resting in fat or touching bone.

La Caja China Prime Rib

(See below for oven roasting instructions)

Place disposable pans beneath the Caja China rack to catch the drippings, tent ribs loosely with foil, fire up your smoke box (I use oak), and close the roasting box.

Add 16 lbs. of charcoal for model #1 or 20 lbs. for model #2 or Semi-Pro Box, divided into two piles, and light up.

At 30 minutes, spread coals over surface. Cooking time starts now.

At 1 hour (cooking time), lift the lid and quickly baste the roasts, and re-tent with foil. Dump excess ashes, close La Caja China and add another 10lbs of unlit coals.

After 2 hours (cooking time), – baste again, remove the foil, and close the box to brown the top of the roasts.

Cook until rib roasts reach an internal temperature of 120 degrees F. Then remove the foil and brown 10 to 15 minutes longer.

Remove the roasts from La Caja China, cover with aluminum foil, transfer the roasts to a large carving board, and let the meat rest for 30 minutes

Remember, the rib roast will continue to cook as it sets. The temperature will rise from 125 degrees F to 130-135 degree internal temperature (medium rare) at 15 to 20 minutes.

If allowed to rest as long as an hour, the temperature will rise even higher.

Carefully lift the salt crust off the meat and transfer to a bowl. Brush away any excess salt.

To remove the roast in one piece while keeping the rib rack intact, run a long sharp carving knife along the bones, using them as your guide.

Carve the prime rib roast 1-inch thick and serve, passing some of the crumbled salt crust as a condiment.

This recipe can be doubled or tripled with very little additional roasting time.

For Oven Roasting:

*Add 2 Tbs mesquite liquid smoke to the wet rub.

Preheat the oven to 375 degree F.

Place rubbed and rested roast on a rack in the pan with the rib side down and the fatty side up. Roast for 1 hour.

Turn off oven. Leave roast in oven but do not open oven door for 3 hours.

About 30 to 40 minutes before serving time, turn oven to 375 degrees F and reheat the roast.

Important: Do not remove roast or re-open the oven door from time roast is put in until ready to serve.

(By the way, if you’re enjoying this article, you may want to subscribe to our free meal planning newsletter; we’ll send seven amazing dinner recipes and a shopping list to your inbox each week. Plus, you’ll be helping us feed the hungry, and teach nutrition, shopping, and hands-on cooking classes to at-risk teens!)

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Filed under In The Box Recipes, Off The Grill

Next level brisket tip

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If you finish your brisket in the oven, or wrapped in foil in the smoker, read on…

I was smoking a couple of briskets in my La Caja China, using Renner’s “True Texas Brisket” recipe from the cookbook, and making a batch of beans (also in the cookbook) for a get-together this weekend and, after prepping the beans, I realized that I had a half-a-dozen sweet onions left over.

In an inspired moment, I sliced the onions into 1/2 inch rounds and covered the bottom of a full steam pan with them.

Next I added a half-dozen whole garlic cloves (peeled), and finally, placed my smoked brisket on top of  it all to finish in the oven for four hours.

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When the brisket was done, and rested, I moved it to the cutting board and there, beneath that beautiful piece of meat, was a layer of smokey, beefy caramelized onions and roasted garlic, soaking in a bath of brisket broth.

(By the way, if you’re enjoying this article, you may want to subscribe to our free meal planning newsletter; we’ll send seven amazing dinner recipes and a shopping list to your inbox each week. Plus, you’ll be helping us feed the hungry, and teach nutrition, shopping, and hands-on cooking classes to at-risk teens!)

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I served these with the sliced and pulled brisket on halved potato rolls, with a little extra sauce. People freaked out!

Not only did this make an amazing slider topping, but the onions and garlic flavor subtly permeated the brisket to add an amazing depth of flavor.

Just one of those “I wonder what would happen” moments that will now be a permanent part of the recipe!

Chef Perry
SimplySmartDinnerPlans.com

7 Comments

Filed under In The Box Recipes