Tag Archives: Pulled pork

President’s Day and Barbecue

Coming up on one of my favorite barbecue holidays…Presidents Day!

Oh sure, you can have your Memorial Day, and Independence Day, and Labor Day, but the problem with those are, everyone else is barbecuing as well! It can be hard to get enough folks over to justify a decent pig-pickin’ when every Weber on the block is burnin’ dogs.

Besides, Presidents Day has such a fine history or barbecue…

“When George Washington “went in to Alexandria to a Barbecue and stayed all Night,” as he wrote in his diary for May 27, 1769, he won eight shillings playing cards and probably ate meat from a whole hog, cooked for hours over hardwood coals, then chopped or “pulled.”

By the early nineteenth century at the latest, a sauce of vinegar and cayenne pepper (originally West Indian) was being sprinkled on the finished product.  This ur-barbecue can be found to this day in eastern North Carolina and the adjoining regions of South Carolina and Virginia, virtually unchanged.” (Adapted from Holy Smoke: The Tar Heel Barbecue Tradition, by John Shelton Reed, Dale Volberg Reed, and Will McKinney to be published by the University of North Carolina Press, forthcoming 2008.)

Says Steven Raichlen, author of “Planet Barbecue” and host of “Primal Grill” on PBS, “Our presidents were known to be big fans of the laid-back pastime as well. George Washington’s diaries abound with references to barbecues, including one that lasted for three days. George Washington was a major barbecue buff, and when Abraham Lincoln’s parents were married, their wedding feast was a barbecue.”

Lyndon Johnson built his campaign around Texas-style barbecues, a variation on an old tradition: In the 19th century, roast pig and whiskey were staples at political rallies. Having combined generous amounts of Kentucky bourbon and slow-roasted pork on occassion myself, I can say with some authority that this is a wise political tactic…after several hours you would passionately cast your vote for the pig, if someone put a ballot in your hand!

In fact, President Johnson had a full-time barbecue chef, Mr, Walter Jetton, employed on the LBJ Ranch full time. I have his cookbook…it’s highly amusing.

Ronald Reagan engaged the BBQ catering services of Wayne Monk of Lexington for the 1983 Economic Summit in Williamsburg.

Even President Obama, who, having grown up in Hawaii, is likely to have an undeniable love of pork…I mean bbq of  course…got into the action with Iron Chef Bobby Flay, grilling up some fine looking steaks at the White House for the Young Men’s Barbeque in 2009. (Hope they were good…we payed for ’em! lol)

So, in tribute to my favorite bbq holiday, here’s how you can prepare some fantastic, White House worthy pulled pork barbecue of your own on your gas grill or La Caja China (click links for recipes.)

And, of course, if you can get a herd of hungry revelers over, you can go whole hog…but I’d put the bourbon away first, if I were you.

And here’s my favorite “traditional” bbq sauce recipe, from …which is probably pretty similar to what Ol’ George sunk his wooden teeth into, at those all-night poker parties!

Perk’s Tradition BBQ Sauce

1 cup white vinegar
1 cup cider vinegar
1 tablespoon brown sugar
1 tablespoon cayenne pepper
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon ground black pepper

Combine the white vinegar, cider vinegar, brown sugar, cayenne pepper, salt and pepper in a jar or bottle with a tight-fitting lid. Refrigerate for 1 to 2 days before using so that the flavors will blend. Shake occasionally.

Enjoy the day!

-Perry

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Low and Slow Barbecue on a Gas Grill

When BBQ enthusiasts read “low and slow” our minds usually drift to images of deep smoke-blackened pits, seeping lazy tendrils of white smoke, as whole oak and hickory logs smolder beneath.

I mean, grills are made for searing burgers and dogs, or maybe getting some nice marks on a chicken breast or a thick steak…but they don’t do “barbecue”…right?

Well, I’m here to tell ya, you can get some amazing, mouth-watering, fall-off-the-bone tender, low and slow barbecue from your gas grill, too. You just have to change up your technique a little bit.

Why “Low & Slow”

High heat causes rapid moisture loss. Proteins in meat and seafood naturally contain a great deal of liquid, but as heat forces these protein strands to rapidly constrict, much of that moisture, is squeezed out, and meat becomes tough and leathery. Succulent, buttery pulled-pork becomes tender when the naturally tough collagen in the meat is converted into gelatin, with a minimum loss of moisture. This transformation occurs when the pork is cooked at temperatures between 225-250 (I get better results at 225) for 10-12 hours, hence the term, “low and slow.”

Personally, I would recommend using a smoking box to hold wood chips for the first several hours of cooking time, as well. There are many commercial varieties, but a clean tuna can, filled with non-resinous wood chips and wrapped in foil (with a few holes punched through the top) works just fine too.

Read the rest of this article, and get our recipes for my favoritelow-and-slow pork shoulder, bbq dry rub, and “dirty secret” sauce, here!

Perry P. Perkins is a Grilling is Happiness sponsored writer.

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How to get super crispy pork shoulders

Here’s a tip for getting awesome pork shoulders/legs with super crispy skin and a buttery center, in either your smoker, bbq, or oven.

Once you’ve smoked or roasted your rubbed and brined shoulder to perfection (10-12 hours at 235°F in your oven or smoker), remove the pork from heat and tent with foil.

Let your shoulder rest at room temperature for at and hour, untouched.

Crank up your oven to 500°F and allow to preheat. Return the shoulder to the oven and roast until skin is blistered and puffed, rotating every 5 minutes, about 20 minutes total. Remove it from the oven, re-tent with foil and allow the meat to rest an additional 15 minutes.

Serve by chopping in the kitchen, or just bring it to the table and let guests pick meat and crispy skin themselves, serve with a variety of dipping sauces, and some warm potato rolls or cornbread on the side

Enjoy!

-Perry

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La Caja China – Questions before I buy

Out Burnin’ Love BBQ friend Josh is considering adding a La Caja China to his cooking arsenal, and posed some excellent questions. I’m re-posting them, along with my answers, for anyone else who’s thinking of picking up a magic box.

Josh: I’ve been debating the merits of La Caja China for a couple months now (my wife is sick of me talking about it!!). I think the only way I can justify the purchase (to my wife) is if I can use it to cook ribs, briskets, pork butts, and maybe even mass quantities of burgers. As such, I have the following questions that I hope you’ll be willing to help me with.

Perry: Hey Josh, I hear you…I think my wife’s final word on the subject was along the lines of, “Just buy the freakin’ thing already!” LOL

Josh: Have you used the smoke pistol that the La Caja China folks sell on their site? I’ve read blogs where folks use a pan of wood chips inside the unit, but would like your opinion. If you’ve used the smoke pistol, will you please comment on it’s effectiveness? If you’ve found another way to smoke meat with La Caja China, I’d love to hear about it.

Perry: Yes, I’ve used the smoke pistol, as well as the pan method, and a couple of others. You can see my full review on my favorite smokin’ hardware in this post: A-Maze-N Pellet Smoker Review.

Josh: I see you mentioned that Cuban pork is done tender, but firm. How do ribs turn out? I’m really looking for ‘fall off the bone’ ribs. I see that many people use La Caja China to cook ribs, but I haven’t seen any pictures/videos that show that the ribs are really tender.

Perry: Yup, I do low and slow ribs, both beef and pork in my La Caja China, and have several great recipes in my La Caja China cookbooks. For beef ribs, see this recipe: Beef Ribs in LaCajaChina

Josh: How do pork butts turn out? Right now, I use a combination of a Smokenator (a clever addition to a Weber Kettle grill) and my oven for a total of 16 hours (at 220 degrees) and the butts literally fall apart.

They are amazing. I’m confident that the pork butts that come out of La Caja China are great, but I’d really like to know if it will be possible to get the type of results I get from the smoker/oven.

Perry: I know exactly the method you’re referring to, as I did it the same way for years. Butts and shoulders are my #1 use for my boxes, and I’ve cooked many, many dozens of them, both for myself and for customers of our bbq catering biz. I can smoke 6-8 shoulders at a time in the larger boxes.

Want to take the hassle out of meal planning? For super-simple, healthy and delicious dinner recipes, check out our FREE weekly meal plans and shopping lists!

I inject and rub, then cook to 190, then wrap and rest. Save any juices, and mix them back into the shredded meat with a touch of cider vinegar. Shoulders come out perfect. Search this site for “shoulders”, there are a bunch here, and more in the cookbooks.

Josh: I’m look at the #2 unit. I know you have the Pro, but are you able to comment on the durability of the wooden units? Are they sturdy? Structurally sound? Etc? any info you have on this would be helpful.

Perry: I have the Semi-Pro, two of the model #2 units, and a model #3. My first box was a model #2. It’s seven years old, and we’ve done dozens of pigs, 25-30 shoulders, a couple of dozen turkeys, 20-25 briskets, a couple of lambs, and a whole bunch of chickens in it, and it’s still going strong. I need to replace the firepan, but that’s because of user error (I backed over it with my truck and tweaked it, lol.)

If you’re in a low-humidity area, I recommend keeping it covered and it’s fine to store outside. I keep mind the the garage, as I live in Oregon.

Hope this helps! I love answering questions about La Caja China, and barbeque in general, so keep firin’ away! If you haven’t done so, make sure to download my free ebook, the La Caja China Guidebook, here.

And, of course, can still roast an amazing pig in there, as well! 🙂 See my step-by-step video, here!

Thanks again!

-Perry

Perry P. Perkins
Author
“La Caja China Cooking”
“La Caja China World”
“MEAT FIRE GOOD”
Burnin’ Love BBQ
http://www.burninloveblog.com
http://www.facebook.com/BurninLoveBBQ

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How to Carve a Whole Roast Pig

http://i0.wp.com/burninlovebbq.files.wordpress.com/2011/07/p6050137b1.jpg?resize=220%2C165Fellow La Caja China fan, Byron, asked:

Perry, I have a HUGE pig roast coming up. Well the pig is going to be average size, but we are tailgating on the river and I ‘ve invited my biggest customer and his family to join me. I have done a lot of pigs in the LCC and I am good with that part.

Do you have or does any of the cook books have some hits or ideas on the process after the pig is done? In the past it was always family and friends so we just cut it up the best we could and ate it. I need to do this more like a catering event with side and things. Thanks…

Okay, so I did some looking around, and couldn’t really find any illustrated carving instructions that I really liked…so I made my own!

Click this link to download the PDF, Carving a Whole Roast Pig

These directions would work nicely with any of the “Pig Roasting Party Themes” included in my free eBook, the La Caja China Guidebook.  And, of course, there are tons of side dish recipes in La Caja China Cooking, and La Caja China World.

Hope this helps!

-Perry

PS – Before you carve that piggy, you gotta roast it! Check out my step-by-step video, here!

Want to take the hassle out of meal planning? For super-simple, healthy and delicious dinner recipes, check out our FREE weekly meal plans and shopping lists! Your free membership helps us teach valuable cooking skills to at-risk youth!

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National Mustard Day – World’s oldest mustard bbq sauce recipe!

It’s National Mustard Day!

For your bbq & grilling pleasure (drumroll please…) the world’s oldest mustard bbq sauce recipe:

Mustard is a condiment made from the seeds of a mustard plant (white or yellow mustard, Sinapis hirta; brown or Indian mustard, Brassica juncea; or black mustard, Brassica nigra). The whole, ground, cracked, or bruised mustard seeds are mixed with water, salt, lemon juice or other liquids, and sometimes other flavorings and spices, to create a paste or sauce ranging in color from bright yellow to dark brown.

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The aPORKalypse Sandwich

I can tell you, from personal experience, that sometimes the title comes first. A single line so compelling that you know…you know…that there’s a story worth writing, hidden within.

The same can happen, apparently, with barbecue.

A few months ago, a Facebook friend of mine used the word “aPORKalypse” on my Burnin’ Love BBQ Page.  I was instantly besotted. I had to use that word…I had to create a recipe worthy of its awesomeness.  It haunted my dreams.

Since then, I have prepared this dish dozens of times in my mind, tweaking the ingredients, massaging the methods, and expending a great deal of drool, until, finally, it was time to open the roof to the storms, allow the lighting to flash down, and bring my glorious creation to smoky, succulent life.

Long after I’m rolled into that last great fire-pit…this is the recipe I want to be remembered for…

The aPORKalypse Sandwich

Recipe by Perry P. Perkins

Sandwich:
2 pub rolls, toasted
2-4 Tbs Texas Pepper Jelly’s Apple Habanero
2 aPORKalypses (see below)
2 slices smoked Gouda cheese
2 slices Black Forest Ham

The aPORKalypse:
1/2 cup favorite BBQ sauce (I like Sweet Baby Ray’s Brown Sugar)
4 tsp dry rub
20 slices of bacon
2 – 2 inch thick boneless pork chops
1 cup leftover pulled pork (chopped)
2 Tbs apple juice
8-10 toothpicks

Flatten pork chops until about 1 1/2 inches thick, and slightly larger than your pub rolls. Brine the chops for 1 1/2 – 2 hours.  Remove from brine, pat dry, and rub with a salt-free dry rub (smoked paprika, garlic, powdered ginger, maybe a touch of chili powder, and brown sugar is my favorite), and set aside.

Sprinkle leftover pulled pork with 2 Tbs of apple juice and, in a covered pan, warm in a 200d oven for 1 hour, or until hot.

Weave bacon into 2 mats, using 10 slices each (5×5)

Cut a deep pocket into each chop, carefully stuff each pocket with hot pulled pork.

Set the stuffed chop in the center of the bacon mat, and fold bacon over the top, until chop is completely covered. Pin bacon in place, using as many toothpicks as necessary.

Over a medium apple-wood fire, grill each aPORKalypse until well marked on each side, moving with necessary to avoid scorching from flare-ups. Once each side is marked, move to indirect heat and close lid, or cover with a disposable pan, or loosely tented foil.

Grill 10-15 minutes, turning and basting with bbq sauce, until aPORKalypse feels firm to the touch. On the last turn top with smoked Gouda cheese, and a slice of lightly grilled Black Forest Ham, each. Cover again, allowing the cheese to melt.

Remove from heat and set on a warm plate to rest 10 minutes.

Split and toast pub rolls.

Place the aPORKalypse on the bottom half of the roll, spread the top of each roll with 1-2 Tbs Apple Habanero pepper jelly (halve for more sensitive palates)…this is the key ingredient to the whole experience, the fiery, sweet apple jelly as counterpoint to the smoky, salty bacon, and savory pork.

You may find this stuff other places, but it won’t be as good as Texas Pepper Jelly’s…just sayin’…

Optional extras (not that it needs any!), that may be added to the bottom bun:

Lettuce
Tomato
Pickles
Red onion slices
Pickled okra

Any of the above should be well chilled and crisp, added seconds before serving.

Slice each sandwich into halves or quarters, and serve immediately.

A small dish of complimentary Lipitor tablets is optional, as well.

Thank you, and goodnight.

-Perry

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Millie’s BBQ Sauce Review

Since my childhood, I can remember my mother Millie cooking so many delicious southern dishes using her famous sauce.  Millie’s memory still lives on in our family, as she has inspired my wife and I to re-create this one of a kind sweet and tasty barbecue sauce. 

– Craig & Toni Brown

The first commercial barbecue sauce was made by H.J. Heinz Co. in 1948, and today there are hundreds if not thousands of varieties of jars, jugs, and bottles available.

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What the big boys (and girls) are grilling…4th of July BBQ Recipes from Food Network

Heyya Peeps!

Well, we’re countin’ down to Independence Day, and planning on what to grill up while Will Smith, once again,  kick’s some serious alien butt.

I really want to play with my new oyster racks, and I’m jonesing for some grilled lamb, as well, so I cruised on over to the Food Network site to see what the big boys (and girls) were throwing on the fire.

Here are a few that had me droolin’ on my keyboard…

Guy Fieri’s Malibu oysters. Mario’s black pepper drumsticks. Paula’s easy BBQ chicken. Bobby Flay’s Smoked Ribs. Alton Brown’s Pulled Pork. Giada’s Grilled Lamb

Six top celebrity chefs’ favorite grilling recipes for the Fourth of July!

“Time to kick the tires, and light the fires, big daddy!”

Guy Fieri’s Malibu Oysters
Total Time: 30 min
Prep: 15 min
Cook: 15 min

Yield: 8 oysters
Level: Easy

* 8 large oysters, BBQ size
* 1/3 cup mayonnaise
* 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar
* 2 tablespoons Parmesan
* Salt and freshly ground black pepper
* 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
* 1/4 teaspoon ground white pepper
* 1 cup fried potato sticks (recommended: Pik-Nik)
* 2 teaspoons olive oil
* 2 tablespoons finely diced red bell pepper
* 2 tablespoons finely diced red onion
* 1 1/2 cups baby spinach
* 6 ounces havarti cheese, sliced
* Rock salt, for baking

Preheat a grill to high. Preheat the oven to 500 degrees F.

Shuck the oysters and set aside in the refrigerator or on ice, keeping them in the shell.

In a small bowl, combine the mayonnaise, white vinegar, Parmesan, salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste, cayenne, and white pepper. Stir to combine, and then stir in the fried potato sticks.

In a small saute pan, add the olive oil and heat over medium-high heat. Add the bell peppers and red onions and saute for 3 minutes, and then add the spinach and allow to wilt. Adjust seasoning, to taste.

Top each oyster with the spinach mixture, dividing evenly, and then do the same with the mayo mixture. Top with the havarti and place on a baking sheet lined with a layer of rock salt. Roast in the oven until cheese is bubbly and oysters are just warmed through, 5 to 6 minutes.

Let cool enough to handle, and then serve right away.

Recipe Courtesy of Food Network, 2011

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Mario Batali’s Spicy Black-Pepper-Coated Drumsticks
(Serves 6)

Partly cooking the drumsticks in the oven ensures that they will cook through on the grill without charring. You can bake the chicken early in the day or even the night before.

12 chicken drumsticks
Kosher salt
1/2 cup buttermilk
2 tablespoons Tabasco sauce, preferably chipotle
1 tablespoon fennel seeds, lightly crushed in a spice or coffee grinder
2 tablespoons freshly ground black pepper
2 fennel bulbs
4 ounces Gorgonzola dolce
1/4 cup red wine vinegar
1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil

Preheat the oven to 400°F.

Place the drumsticks on a baking sheet and season all over with salt. Bake unadorned for 20 minutes (25 minutes if your drumsticks are very large).

Meanwhile, in a medium bowl, stir together the buttermilk, Tabasco sauce, fennel seeds, and black pepper. Set a wire rack over a large plate or a small baking sheet.

As soon as the drumsticks come out of the oven, toss them, in batches, into the buttermilk mixture and turn to coat, then place skin side up on the rack to drain. Spoon a little of the mixture, with the fennel seeds and pepper, over the top of each one, and set aside. (The drumsticks can be baked and marinated up to a day ahead; leave them on the rack, cover, and refrigerate. Bring to room temperature before grilling.)

Preheat a gas grill or prepare a fire in a charcoal grill.

Trim the fennel bulbs, cut lengthwise in half, and cut out most of the core. Cut into 1/4-inch-wide batonettes and toss into a bowl of ice water.

Crumble the Gorgonzola into a small bowl and mash with a fork. Add the red wine vinegar and stir with the fork until fairly smooth. Drizzle in the oil, stirring, to make a dressing. Pour into one or more shallow bowls for dipping.

Place the drumsticks on the hottest part of the grill, cover the grill, and cook, turning occasionally at first and then more often as they start to caramelize, until cooked through, 10 to 12 minutes.

Put the drumsticks on a platter. Drain the fennel sticks, pat dry, and place on the platter next to the wings. Serve with the Gorgonzola dressing.

Recipe Courtesy of Mario Batali’s Italian Grill (Ecco 2008)

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Paula Deen’s Easy After Work BBQ Chicken
Total Time: 40 min
Prep: 15 min
Cook: 25 min

Yield: 4 servings
Level: Easy

* 1 (3 1/2-pound) chicken, cut into 8 pieces
* Salt and freshly ground black pepper
* 2 cups bottled sauce or Easy BBQ Sauce, recipe follows

Prepare a medium-hot grill or preheat the broiler. If using the broiler, line a rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil.

Season the chicken with salt and pepper, to taste. Put the chicken on the grill or, if broiling, put it on the prepared baking sheet. Grill or broil, 4 inches from the heat, turning once, for 10 minutes per side.

Put 1/2 of the BBQ sauce in a small bowl, for drizzling and serving. Reserve.

Baste the chicken with the remaining sauce and grill or broil for 5 minutes more. Transfer the chicken to a serving platter, drizzle with some of the reserved sauce, and serve with lime wedges and the remaining reserved sauce
Easy BBQ Sauce:

* 3/4 cup ketchup
* 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons packed dark brown sugar
* 3 tablespoons white wine vinegar
* 2 tablespoons minced onion
* 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
* 1/4 to 1 teaspoon hot sauce, (recommended: Tabasco)
* 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
* 3 tablespoons chopped scallions (white and light green parts)
* 1 1/2 teaspoons freshly grated lime zest
* 1 1/2 teaspoons freshly squeezed lime juice
* Lime wedges, for serving

In a small bowl, whisk together the ketchup, brown sugar, vinegar, onion, mustard, hot sauce, and black pepper. Stir in the scallions, lime zest, and lime juice. Can be covered and refrigerated for up to 1 week.

Yield: 2 cups

Recipe Courtesy of Food Network, 2011

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Bobby Flay’s Smoked Ribs with Carolina-Style BBQ Sauce
Total Time: 19 hr 15 min
Prep: 30 min
Inactive: 12 hr 45 min
Cook: 6 hr 0 min

Yield: 4 servings
Level: Intermediate

Rub:
* 1/4 cup ancho chili powder
* 2 tablespoons Spanish paprika
* 2 tablespoons freshly ground black pepper
* 2 tablespoons dry mustard
* 2 tablespoons kosher salt
* 2 tablespoons ground coriander
* 1 tablespoon dried oregano
* 1 tablespoon ground cumin
* 2 teaspoons chile de arbol
* 2 racks St. Louis-style pork ribs, 12 ribs each, membrane removed
* 1/4 cup canola oil

Mop:
* 2 cups cider vinegar
* 2 tablespoons light brown sugar
* 1/2 teaspoon cayenne powder
* Few dashes hot pepper sauce (recommended: Tabasco)
* 1 tablespoon kosher salt
* 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
* Mix of hickory and applewood chips
* 1 quart apple cider
* North Carolina Barbecue Sauce, recipe follows

Carolina Style BBQ Sauce:
* 1/4 cup canola oil
* 2 medium Spanish onions, coarsely chopped
* 6 cloves garlic, coarsely chopped
* 2 cups ketchup
* 2/3 cup water
* 1/4 cup ancho chili powder
* 2 tablespoons paprika
* 2/3 cup Dijon mustard
* 2/3 cup cider vinegar
* 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
* 2 canned chipotle chiles in adobo, chopped
* 1/4 cup dark brown sugar
* 2 tablespoons honey
* 2 tablespoons molasses
* Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

For the rub:

Combine all the spices in a small bowl. Brush both sides of the racks with oil and rub with the spice mixture. Wrap in plastic and refrigerate for at least 12 hours.

In a large pot over low heat, add all the mop ingredients. Bring to a simmer and cook until the sugar is dissolved. Let cool to room temperature.

Remove the ribs from the refrigerator 45 minutes before smoking to allow them to come to room temperature. Add the mix of hickory and applewood chips to the smoker according to package instructions. Heat a smoker to 220 degrees F. Put the apple cider in a small heatproof pan in the smoker.

Put the ribs directly on the smoker rack. Smoke for 6 hours, brushing the ribs with the mop every hour for the first 5 hours. During the last hour, brush the ribs with the North Carolina Barbecue Sauce every 10 minutes. Remove the ribs to a serving platter and serve.

For the BBQ Sauce:

Heat the oil over medium-high heat in a heavy-bottomed medium saucepan. Add the onions and cook until soft, 3 to 4 minutes. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute. Stir in the ketchup and water, bring to a boil and simmer for 5 minutes. Add the remaining ingredients and simmer until thickened, stirring occasionally, about 10 minutes. Cool for about 5 minutes.

Carefully transfer the mixture to a food processor and puree until smooth. Season with salt and pepper, to taste, then pour into a bowl and allow to cool at room temperature. Sauce will keep for 1 week in the refrigerator, stored in a tightly sealed container.

Recipe Courtesy of Food Network, 2011

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Alton Brown’s Pulled Pork
Total Time: 24 hr 20 min
Prep: 20 min
Inactive: 13 hr 0 min
Cook: 11 hr 0 min

Yield: 8 to 10 servings
Level: Easy

Brine:
* 8 ounces or 3/4 cup molasses
* 12 ounces pickling salt
* 2 quarts bottled water
* 6 to 8 pound Boston butt

Rub:
* 1 teaspoon whole cumin seed
* 1 teaspoon whole fennel seed
* 1 teaspoon whole coriander
* 1 tablespoon chili powder
* 1 tablespoon onion powder
* 1 tablespoon paprika

Video: Watch Alton make this recipe

Combine molasses, pickling salt, and water in 6 quart Lexan. Add Boston butt making sure it is completely submerged in brine, cover, and let sit in refrigerator for a minimum of 8 hours. 12 hours is ideal.

Place cumin seed, fennel seed, and coriander in food grinder and grind fine. Transfer to a small mixing bowl and stir in chili powder, onion powder, and paprika.

Remove Boston butt from brine and pat dry. Sift the rub evenly over the shoulder and then pat onto the meat making sure as much of the rub as possible adheres. More rub will adhere to the meat if you are wearing latex gloves during the application.

Preheat smoker to 210 degrees F. Place butt in smoker and cook for 10 to12 hours, maintaining a temperature of 210 degrees F. Begin checking meat for doneness after 10 hours of cooking time. Use fork to check for doneness. Meat is done when it falls apart easily when pulling with a fork. Once done, remove from pot and set aside to rest for at least 1 hour. Pull meat apart with 2 forks and serve as sandwich with coleslaw and dressing as desired.

Recipe Courtesy of Food Network, 2011

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Giada De Laurentiis’ Grilled Lamb with Salsa Verde
Total Time: 1 hr 25 min
Prep: 30 min
Inactive: 15 min
Cook: 40 min

Yield: 8 servings
Level: Easy

*  1/4 cup salted capers, soaked for 30 minutes, drained, coarsely chopped
* 1/2 cup chopped fresh Italian flat leaf parsley
* 1/3 cup chopped scallions
* 1/2 cup chopped fresh mint leaves
* 1/2 cup fresh lemon juice
* 2 teaspoons grated lemon peel
* 1 cup olive oil, preferably extra-virgin
* 2 teaspoons dried crushed red pepper flakes
* 3 1/2 teaspoons coarse salt
* 1 1/2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper
* 1 (4 1/2 to 5-pound) butterflied boned lamb shoulder
* 1 tablespoon minced garlic
* Nonstick cooking spray

Stir the first 7 ingredients and 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes in a large bowl to blend. Whisk in 1 1/2 teaspoons of salt and 1/2 teaspoon of black pepper. Set the salsa verde aside. Place the lamb in a 15 by 10 by 2-inch glass baking dish. Rub the minced garlic, remaining 2 teaspoons of salt, 1 teaspoon of black pepper, and remaining 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes all over lamb. Pour 1/2 cup of salsa verde over the lamb, turning the lamb to coat evenly. Use immediately, or cover the dish and remaining salsa verde separately with plastic wrap and refrigerate up to 1 day.

Spray the grill rack with nonstick spray and prepare the barbecue (medium-high heat). Grill the lamb until a meat thermometer inserted into the thicker parts registers 130 degrees F for medium-rare, turning occasionally, about 40 minutes. Transfer the lamb to a work surface and let rest 15 minutes.

Cut the lamb across grain into thin slices. Arrange the lamb slices on a platter. Serve the remaining salsa verde alongside.

What’s on YOUR grill this 4th?

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La Caja China World – Roasting Box Recipes from Around the Globe

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

June 16, 2011

Elk Mountain Books is pleased to announce the release of:

La Caja China World: Roasting Box Recipes from Around the Globe

by Perry P. Perkins

Publication Date: Jun 11, 2011
ISBN 1463563167
Page Count: 158
Binding: US Trade Paper
Trim Size: 7″ x 10″
Categories: Cooking / Methods / Barbecue & Grilling
US$14.95

From the author:

La Caja China, the Cuban roasting box, has become the toast of food writers and celebrity gourmets, including Food Network’s THROWDOWN Chef, Bobby Flay.

In La Caja China Cooking: The Secret to Perfect Roasting, we took a gastronomic tour of America.

With this new collection of recipes, your La Caja China becomes a magic carpet, allowing you to take your friends and family to the far corners of the world, and experience the delicious wonders waiting for you there!

In every culture and country that we researched in gathering this collection, we found people who enjoyed gathering together with loved ones, lighting a fire, cooking meat over it (or under it), and eating together.

Not coincidentally, we think, these folks shared a common passion for life and laughter, as well.

In La Caja China World, we invite your taste buds to join us on a globe-trotting adventure with dishes like:

Grilled Tri-Tip & Chimichurri in Argentina
Whole Roast Pig & Coconut Rice in Bali
Roast lamb & Potatoes in Greece
Beef Short Ribs & Scallion Salad in Korea
Christmas Goose in Sweden

If you’re looking to roast, grill, bake, braise, smoke, or barbecue; whether you’re cooking for a crowd, or creating memories with your family – look no further than La Caja China World!

La Caja China World is available from our eStore, as well as from our official Amazon.com Storefront.

Buy both La Caja China Cooking & La Caja China World, together, and get FREE shipping from Amazon!

Plus – Purchase your copy of La Caja China World by Friday, June 24th, and enter* for a chance to win a $50 grab-bag of your choice of La Caja China accessories! We’ll even pick up the shipping!

*To enter to win the grab-bag, participants must forward a copy of their e-receipt of purchase for La Caja China World, along with full name, mailing address, and personal email address, to editor@elkmountainbooks. All entries must be received by midnight Sunday, June 26th, 2011. One entry per copy ordered.

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About the Author

Perry P. Perkins is a freelance writer and work-from-home dad, born and raised in the Pacific Northwest (with a little time in Georgia.)

Perry has written several books, including two novels, four cookbooks, and two short-story collections. He writes regularly for a number of outdoor and travel magazines, Chicken Soup for the Soul, and several online foodie sites, including his own blog: www.burninloveblog.com

Both Perkins’ father and grandfather were professional chefs, and he was raised with a passion to cook, grill, and barbeque. One of three pit-masters behind Burnin’ Love BBQ, a local catering team, his favorite cooking equipment is La Caja China.

All of Perry’s books can be found at www.perryperkinsbooks.com

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